Woman accused of cutting baby from pregnant woman’s womb


LONGMONT, Colo. (AP) — A 34-year-old woman was accused of stabbing a pregnant woman in the stomach and removing her baby, while the expectant mother visited her home to buy baby clothes advertised on Craigslist, Colorado authorities said.

Officers called to the residence Wednesday afternoon found the 26-year-old victim, who was seven months pregnant, stabbed and beaten, Longmont police Cmdr. Jeff Satur told the Daily Times-Call newspaper (http://bit.ly/1BzW1ZZ ).

She underwent surgery and is expected to recover, but the baby did not survive.

Satur said the suspect arrived at the hospital with the baby and told staff she had suffered a miscarriage.

The pregnant woman was at the home to buy baby clothes that were advertised on Craigslist.

“This is a tragic case for a mother right now,” Satur said. “She came by this house. She was attacked, and her baby was removed from her.”

Investigators have not released the names of the suspect and the pregnant woman but said they did not know each other.

The suspect was arrested at the hospital on suspicion of attempted first-degree murder, first-degree assault and child abuse-knowingly and recklessly resulting in death.

Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett said his office will consider what formal charges to file.
“The issues involving an unborn child are complicated under Colorado law,” he said. “In most circumstances, if a child was not actually born alive, then homicide charges are not possible.”
Police were getting a search warrant for the suspect’s home.

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Five obscure Android apps that should be on your must-use list


Lost among the scores of available Android apps are some specialized tools that might really come in handy. Tom Merritt runs through a few you may not have come across.

If you’re an Android user, you know the Google Play Store is filled with apps — many of which are outstanding, but some of which… are not. Finding a few of the hidden, lesser-known gems isn’t a terribly challenging task, but it can take a while. So to save you a bit of time, I searched the Play Store and came up with five apps you may never have heard of but might benefit from using. Let’s see if any of them fits your bill.

1: Greenify

Greenify (Figure A) will help you identify any apps on your phone that are misbehaving and place them into hibernation. This will effectively save your device battery from prematurely draining. But unlike some other apps that prevent a suspect app from working, Greenify allows you to continue using the application in question. It hibernates suspicious apps only when they are not in use, thus preventing them from draining your battery.

Figure A

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Greenify itself uses little in the way of resources. At most, it uses 5 MB of RAM, zero CPU, and zero battery. A word of warning: Do NOT Greenify your alarm clock, instant messaging, or widget-enabled apps — and DO verify the impact of Greenifying apps you rely on. You also should know that on a non-rooted device, you must manually hibernate apps (which requires just a single tap of the hibernation button). You can automate this process via an accessibility service Greenify provides. The only caveat to using the accessibility service is that Greenify will observe your interactions with apps and retrieve window content. Some users might consider this a bit too intrusive and prefer to handle the hibernate process manually.

2: ProxyDroid

ProxyDroid (REQUIRES ROOT) makes setting a proxy on your Android device incredibly simple. This free app (Figure B) supports HTTP/HTTPS/SOCKS4/SOCKS5 proxy, as well as basic, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication methods. With ProxyDroid you can set up a proxy for an individual app or several apps. By unsetting the global proxy feature, you can select specific apps. You can also set up multiple profiles, which means you can set a proxy for certain apps and another for yet more apps.

Figure B

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As far as proxy apps are concerned, ProxyDroid makes it worth taking the time to root your device. You’ll also find a handy widget for enabling/disabling proxies. Note that when you use the widget, you must have selected the profile to be active within the ProxyDroid settings window. If you’re looking for the single most powerful proxy app available, root your phone and look no further than ProxyDroid.

3: Total Commander

Total Commander (Figure C) is, by far, one of the ugliest file managers you’ll ever use. It is also one of the best. If offers a built-in text editor, properties dialog, FTP/sFTP/WebDAV/OBEX support, plug-ins for cloud services, and features that let you copy/move whole subdirectories, drag and drop, zip/unzip/rar, select/unselect groups of files, search, select a range of files/folders, and much more.

Figure C

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Total commander is like getting the old-school UNIX Midnight Commander on your Android device… only with an updated feature set and a slightly updated interface. One cool interface feature: If you’re viewing in portrait mode, Total Commander displays a single pane. However, when viewing in landscape mode, you see a dual-pane interface.

4: RedLaser Barcode & QR Scanner

RedLaser (Figure D) is a great price-comparison shopping app. Just scan a barcode and it will crawl the internet and display the best online prices available. From there, you can tap the top price to open the item in a web browser and purchase it.

Figure D

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I have found that RedLaser has one of the fastest barcodes scanners available. You won’t waste time trying to line up the camera to the laser. In fact, RedLaser picks up the barcode almost before you have the item/camera lined up — it’s that fast. You can also get local pricing, facts about a product, and reviews. When scanning food items, you’ll get a ton of relevant details, such as allergen information. You can also scan and save your loyalty cards into the app, so you don’t have to pull out your keys or wallet to use those cards (and you can see deals associated with each card).

5: Ambio

When you’re traveling for business, you often wind up in unfamiliar locations (and sometimes in less-than-ideal hotels). Ambio (Figure E) is an ambient sound generator that can help you sleep or focus on the task at hand.

Figure E

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If you can’t sleep because there’s just too much quiet, Ambio will soothe you into slumber with the sounds of the ocean, rain, ticking clocks, fans, airplane cabins, heartbeats, white noise, and much more. And if you don’t like the included sounds, you can download more (including premium sounds). You can even pause sounds and create your own mixes (combining four sounds to create the perfect cacophony of noise to make you forget you’re in an unfamiliar hotel bed trying desperately to get enough sleep to make the next day of work possible.

Source: Techgig.

8 Types of Profile Photos format Never Use on Your LinkedIn Profile


20141218003332-photo-selfieLinkedIn doesn’t play when it comes to professional profile pics and neither should you. If you upload a pic to your profile that isn’t actually of you or isn’t even a headshot, LinkedIn reserves the right to yank it. (Newsflash: There’s no way Hello Kitty’s your doppelganger, m’kay.) Seriously screw up your photo three times and — stee-rike! — you’re out. You’ll be banned from uploading your mug ever again. No joke.

In my opinion, LinkedIn doesn’t ax awful profile pics enough. Sloppy, cheesy, awkward snaps. Egregiously immature, unprofessional lemme-take-a-selfie-style pics that cut it no problem on Instagram, Tinder or Facebook. Here’s a friendly reminder, particularly for the 39 million students and recent college grads lurking on LinkedIn: It’s not for Man Crush Monday, not for swiping right and not for stalking your 8th grade crush.

The 313 million-plus member site is for professional networking, specifically with past and present colleagues, hiring managers, potential clients and investors, and other hopefully business-related contacts. That said, your headshot should be professional. In other words, safe. Appealing to a wide audience. Even a little vanilla.

So, if you want to put your best professional game face forward on LinkedIn — and you do, don’t you? — don’t be guilty of committing these common (and often comical) profile pic sins:

1. The selfie in the mirror pic.

Just please, save your smug, snapped-in-the-bathroom mirror head-to-toe selfies for Facebook. They make you look like an amateur on LinkedIn, even if you look like a boss in your hipster Hugo Boss slim fit suit, or so you think. Come on, by now you should know that selfies of any kind are way too casual for LinkedIn. #wrongplatform

2. The freaky filter overkill pic.

Chill with the funky filters already. Actually, don’t use them at all, not on LinkedIn. Potential employers and clients want to size you up straight up, just as you are, not all uber-emo. In Instagram speak: The “Earlybird” that skips the “Sutro” is more likely to get the worm, dig?

3. The ‘I’m so serious I hate life’ pic.

Never post a profile pic that makes you look incredibly intense, Dwight Schrute-serious or, worst of all, pissed off. There are enough mug shot-worthy frowner-downers littering LinkedIn already. Instead, post a happy (but not too I-just-won-the-lottery happy) headshot that shows off what Richard Branson calls your “competitive advantage,” your smile. Go on, let your pearly whites shine.

With a nice, relaxed smile on your face, you generally come off as more approachable and trustworthy, someone a potential employer (or investor or business partner) might be more willing to give a chance. As Psychology Today puts it, “there’s magic in your smile.” It’s scientifically proven. Use it to your advantage.

4. The beyond blurry pic.

No one should have to squint to make you out. Familiarize yourself with how to use Photoshop’s “Sharpening” tool. Or, if your headshot is too fuzzy or pixelated to fix, use a different, clearer pic. Focus, people. This is pretty basic stuff.

5. The full-body action pic.

I’m not going to name names (I’m not that mean), but a LinkedIn user I maybe, kind of, sort of might be connected with is half-squatting, half-lunging in her profile pic. In a baggy T-shirt and Spandex leggings. On a cracked cement driveway. Yep, like a cat-like Crossfit ninja warrior about to pounce…  just after this quick yoga pose, k? Granted she’s a black belt and a personal trainer (who, er, could easily choke me out tonight in karate class and just might if she reads this), but squatting? On LinkedIn? Really? Just no.

Let’s just stick with vanilla headshots, shall we? They’re more appropriate for the venue. Full body shots, awkwardly posed or not, pack too much weird factor, a vibe you probably don’t want to give off, at least not professionally. Not unless you’re an actual ninja.

6. The ‘Say hello to my kitty’ pic.

Here’s an easy rule to remember: Unless you’re a vet, please don’t pose with your pet. As much as you adore Count Fluffy McFlufferton, I’m sorry, he’s not LinkedIn profile material. You are. Just you. Save your furball’s whisker-licious glamour shots for Tag a Cat, the new Tinder for cats.

7. The ‘Oops, I cropped my shot’ pic.

Technically, you’re more than just a face. You’re a person. A whole person with brains in your head, feet in your shoes and you can post any LinkedIn profile pic you choose. That is, we hope, except for one that oddly crops off the top of your head or the bottom of your chin. Or your ears. You get the full picture. Show your face, your whole face and nothing but your face. Or so help you job, the one you could have gotten (or kept) because you looked the part on LinkedIn.

8. The default LinkedIn silhouette pic.

On top of looking a bit clueless — and like someone who lacks the confidence to back their good name with their face — you’ll miss out on a bunch of profile views if you choose not to upload a photo at all. If you do post a pic of yourself, LinkedIn says people are seven times more likely to click on your profile. So do yourself a solid and just say no to LinkedIn’s creepy two-tone, “male silhouette” default pic. Blech.

A cube with a twist: At 40, the Rubik’s cube puzzles anew


Experts have calculated that a cube could be solved in as few as 20 moves, no matter how it is scrambled.

Experts have calculated that a cube could be solved in as few as 20 moves, no matter how it is scrambled.

JERSEY CITY: A Rubik’s cube can be twisted and twiddled in 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 different ways, and 43,252,003,274,489,855,999 of them are wrong.

Those truths — especially the second, maddeningly frustrating one — have been known since soon after the modish, Mondrianish plastic object was invented in 1974. The cube went on to become the must-have toy of 1980 and 1981.

Its popularity faded fast.

By 1982, the cube was so last year, doomed to Hula-Hoop faddishness. In 1986, The New York Times said the cube had been “retired to the attic, the garbage heap and, with a bow to its elegance and ingeniousness, to the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art”.

Lately it has undergone a resurrection in a world in which engineers and computers can generate helpful algorithms that would-be cube solvers can share with one another. But some things have not changed. The typical Rubik’s cube still has nine squares on six sides, and the same eye-popping colours. And those unfathomable huge numbers in the first paragraph are still quintillions. “Forty-three times 10 to the 19th,” explained Paul Hoffman, the president and chief executive of the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City.

Rubik’s cubes have trailed Hoffman for his entire career. On his first job after college, as an editor at Scientific American, he shepherded a March 1981 cover story about Rubik’s “magic cubology” into print. It was written by Douglas R Hofstadter, the professor known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning best-seller “Godel, Escher, Bach,” who said it had taken him “50 hours of work, distributed over several months,” to solve the “unscrambling problem.” He mentioned group theory, which has to do with algebraic structures, and something he called “cubitis magikia,” a “highly contagious” condition “accompanied by the itching of the fingertips that can be relieved only by prolonged contact” with a certain multicoloured object.

Now Hoffman is capitalizing on the cube again with a $5 million exhibition that opens to the public Saturday. It features an 18-karat gold Rubik’s cube said to be worth $2.5 million that pivots and swivels like an ordinary plastic one, and a cube-solving robot that is no match for speed cubers, as competitors who try to beat the clock are known. It took the machine a minute to unscramble a jumbled cube. In that time, Anthony Brooks, a speed cuber with several records to his name, did it three times, once using only one hand.

Speed cubers can memorize algorithms they have developed on their laptops and shared on websites or by email to unscramble a jumbled cube in less time than it takes to read a sentence like this one aloud. But Brooks said speed cubing also involved muscle memory and tricks, like breaking in a cube the way baseball players break in a glove with neatsfoot oil. “You can buy lubricants — cube lubes,” he said. “Or regular silicon spray you can find in any hardware.”

In the 40 years since it was invented, the cube has made some intriguing cameo appearances. Edward J Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who has leaked intelligence secrets, told two journalists he had arranged to meet that they would recognize him outside a restaurant in Hong Kong because he would have a Rubik’s cube in his hand. Hoffman said that sounded like a homage to the 2009 film “Duplicity,” in which spies played by Julia Roberts and Clive Owen realize who they are because they are both carrying Rubik’s cube key chains.

That could not have happened to the cube’s inventor, Erno Rubik, 69. He said he did not travel with a cube.

“I don’t need to,” Rubik said as he previewed the exhibition this week.

For the record, he calls it “my cube.”

“From my mouth, it sounds strange to call it ‘Rubik’s cube,'” Rubik said. “If I have a child, I call it ‘my child’ not ‘Rubik’s boy’ or ‘Rubik’s girl.’ Naturally, after 40 years, I have a strong relationship with my cube.”

He passed a display case containing his original pride and joy, a wooden cube. It sat in front of the Hungarian patent he was issued for his “magic cube” in 1975. He invented the cube as the solution to the kind of structural problem that could bedevil an architecture professor, which is what he was at the time. The structural problem was how to keep a mechanism with many moving parts from tumbling to the floor.

Do not expect him to face off against a speed cuber like Rowe Hessler, a bowling-alley manager from Riverhead, NY Hessler, 23, is a former US speed cubing champion, whose fastest time unscrambling a standard three-by-three-by-three cube was 6.94 seconds.

At the science centre, Hessler did it in a seemingly effortless 9.69 seconds of twisting and pivoting. The only noise was the cube, clicking like bad dentures in a cartoon.

Rubik said he had not imagined when the ink on the patent was fresh that the cube would become so universal. “I had a feeling about the intellectual value of the cube” early on, he said, adding that items with intellectual value can be a hard sell in a material world. Rubik said he had thought that toy manufacturers would pigeonhole it as a puzzle. “Traditionally, the puzzle section in the toy business is very narrow,” he said, “and they don’t believe it’s possible to make a business. They’re not selling mass production.”

He said the cube had changed that thinking.

Hoffman said 1 billion to 2.5 billion cubes had been manufactured, assuming there were five counterfeits for every legitimate one sold. “They’ve seized whole 747s full of illegal knockoffs,” he said.

Experts have calculated that a cube could be solved in as few as 20 moves, no matter how it is scrambled. But speed cubers do not have time to think about the elegance of economy implied by minimizing moves. Hessler said speed cubers averaged about 50; his lowest was 31.

For his part, Rubik declined an invitation to go up against Hessler, but he said he understood the appeal of speed cubing, even if it was not the sport for him.

“The main group who is buying the cube is teenagers,” Rubik said, “and they are competitive and they have the time. When you are working, you don’t have the time.”

source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/A-cube-with-a-twist-At-40-the-Rubiks-cube-puzzles-anew/articleshow/34229873.cms

Use Whatsapp on Android? Your chats are not so secure


whatsapp

If you use WhatsApp on an Android phone, you should be careful about what you talk about or share on the instant messaging app.

NEW DELHI: If you use WhatsApp on an Android phone, you should be careful about what you talk about or share on the instant messaging app. Using a few scripts and a rogue app, anyone can peer into your chat logs and see what you talk about with your friends.

A Dutch security consultant has found that WhatsApp chat logs saved on the SD card of an Android phone can be read by other apps because of the way Android allows sharing of data between apps.

“The WhatsApp database is saved on the SD card which can be read by any Android application if the user allows it to access the SD card. And since majority of the people allows everything on their Android device, this is not much of a problem,” Bas Bosschert wrote on his blog.

“What do we need to steal someone’s WhatsApp database? First we need a place to store the database,” Bosschert explained. “Next thing we need is an Android application which uploads the WhatsApp database to the website.”

When an Android application is installed, whether from the Play store or through an APK file, which is an installer file for Android phones and can be downloaded from various sources, the app requests for permissions to use network and SD card etc.

To explain his hack, Bosschert set up a web server and then created an Android application that required several special permissions on a user’s phone. But because Android OS allows applications to access various parts of the phone – this is why users can conveniently share almost everything through any app on Android phone – Bosschert’s app had no difficulty gaining access to WhatsApp data.

Bosschert wrote that the code that allows his application to access WhatsApp data and then upload it to his web server can be added to a popular Android app by a rogue developer to fool users and steal WhatsApp chat logs.

The older versions of WhatsApp were so insecure that they didn’t even encrypt their data stored on SD card. The data from older versions of whatsApp could be read by anyone once it was uploaded on the web server. Even the data from newer version of WhatsApp, which uses encryption, can be accessed with ease.

“The WhatsAppp database is a SQLite3 database which can be converted to Excel for easier access. Lately WhatsApp is using encryption to encrypt the database, so it can no longer be opened by SQLite. But we can simply decrypt this database using a simple python script. This script converts the crypted database to a plain SQLite3 database,” wrote Bosschert. “We can conclude that every application can read the WhatsApp database and it is also possible to read the chats from the encrypted databases.”

Bosschert joked, “Facebook didn’t need to buy WhatsApp to read your chats.”

The security issue apparently doesn’t exist on iPhones or Windows Phone devices because on these smartphones, apps have limited access to storage and other phone hardware. The more flexible access to phone hardware allows Android apps to talk to each other and helps a user quickly share content between apps. This is very convenient compared to what is possible on iPhone or Windows Phone, where it is difficult to share content between apps. But it also exposes data to rogue apps.

Google says that it keeps an eye on apps inside its Play store and removes apps if they pose any security risks. But this doesn’t negate the fact that theoretically it is possible for a rogue app to do more damage on Android because of the open nature of the OS compared to iOS, which uses silos. Google also advises people against installing apps that don’t come through Play store. By default Android phones are set to not install apps downloaded outside the Play store.

Nokia’s new Android smartphone


BARCELONA: By design, Nokia’s new Android smartphones will underwhelm users of high-end phones. The Nokia X line was created with emerging markets in mind, so the company emphasized keeping prices low, meaning the user interface is relatively simple.

Nokia-X-Dual-SIM-Arc

The home screen resembles the one on Nokia’s Windows-based Lumia phones, even though it’s Android underneath. But Nokia added a Fastlane feature, a screen with quick access to your most-used apps. You get to it by swiping from the left or right edge of the home screen or tapping the back button at the bottom.

The basic Nokia X phone costs 89 euros ($122) and has a 4-inch screen, measured diagonally, and a 3-megapixel camera. A X+ version with an SD storage card costs 99 euros, while an XL with a 5-inch screen and 5 megapixel camera goes for 109 euros.

Nokia-X-Dual-SIM-2

In the brief time I’ve had with the Nokia X at this week’s Mobile World Congress wireless show in Barcelona, Spain, I have found the Fastlane feature to be a good start. It’s something I would like to see on more phones, including Nokia’s Windows devices.

I hate to spend time customizing gadgets, getting the icons for the most-used apps on the main home screen. The nice thing about Fastlane is that you don’t have to spend any time on that. Your favorite apps are just one swipe away – sort of.

The top of Fastlane shows you what’s coming up, whether that’s alarms about to ring or future events in your calendar. Below that are your recently used apps. The ones you just used will be at the top, so you don’t have to scroll down.

For some apps, you get information that normally comes with notifications, such as previews of text messages or alerts that three people have tried to reach you on WeChat, a Chinese social network. You see small versions of recent photos and can tap for the larger version in the photo gallery app. You see calls you missed, songs you heard and websites you visited.

It could get overwhelming, so you can block certain apps and certain notifications from appearing in Fastlane. In the settings, you can also add a shortcut to one social network, such as Facebook or Twitter.

Nokia-X-Dual-SIMThat’s where Fastlane can improve – understanding better which apps I use most over a period of days or months and creating a section at the top for those.

This week, for example, I was too busy to check Facebook, but that doesn’t mean I don’t use it regularly. But in Fastlane, Facebook would drop toward the bottom in a matter of days, unless I happen to choose it as my one shortcut.

Why not make sure the most-used apps are stored as favorites at the top of the screen? Nokia says it’s considering that.

Likewise, if I haven’t used something for months after using it daily, Fastlane can assume I’ve grown tired of it and automatically remove it. Myspace anyone?

Nokia doesn’t plan to make Fastlane for its Windows phones, and I doubt it’ll extend it to rival Android phones, such as my Samsung Galaxy S III. It’s something it wants to keep exclusive to its own phones to compete.

‘Indians’ tortured, buried alive in Saudi Arabia: Report


ccording to media reports, the local police claimed to have arrested 25 men in connection with the brutal killings.

ccording to media reports, the local police claimed to have arrested 25 men in connection with the brutal killings.

NEW DELHI: In a shocking revelation, three men have confessed to a Saudi Arabia court of torturing and burying alive five Asian workers in 2010.

According to a report in Arab News, the three men confessed in the Qatif general court on Wednesday of torturing five Asian workers — believed to be Indians — for hours and then burying them alive.

The decomposed bodies of the five men were recovered from a farm in Safwa, a city in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia, situated on the Gulf coast.

The report claimed that the local police have arrested 25 men in connection with the brutal killings.

The website quoted one of the accused, as saying: “I was driving around with a friend using drugs and alcohol when I received a call from another friend at around 10pm. My friend asked me to meet him immediately at a farm.”

“We reached the farm and saw five workers with their hands tied in the seating area. When the friend with me asked why they were tied, our host said that one of them had sexually harassed his sponsor’s daughter and other women,” the man told the court.

“I saw that the five Indian workers were tied and unconscious, just before we went to another room to drink alcohol and smoke hashish. While we were drinking, I heard one of them screaming so I went out and slapped him in the face,” Arab News quoted the man as saying.

“We tied them again with ropes and adhesive tape so that they could not move,” he added while describing in detail the horrific incident four years ago.

The man said their host brought his pickup truck and the three loaded the workers onto it. They then dumped them into a 2.5-meter-deep hole,” the man told the court.

According to the report, some of the victims were identified by the investigators, who found engraved gold ring and residence cards, from the decaying remains.

The decomposed bodies were found with ropes around their arms and legs and their mouths filled with cotton and covered with duct tape, it said.