Sirens to alert people in case of earthquakes in Uttarakhand


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DEHRADUN: IIT-Roorkee has developed a regional early warning system which will alert people in Uttarakhand in the event of an earthquake by sounding a siren.

A siren will scream after getting required signals from sensors to be put up in quake-sensitive areas across the state and alert people in case of earthquakes so they get enough time to reach safety, seismic scientist from IIT-R Ashok Kumar said in a presentation at a meeting of the Advisory Group Committee on disaster management chaired by Chief Secretary S Ramawamy.

84 sensors have already been installed in quake-prone areas of Uttarakhand out of a total of 1,100 sensors to be put up throughout the state, Kumar said at the meeting.

After the installation of sensors is complete, sirens will begin to be installed in sensitive areas, an official release quoting him said.

A mobile app has also been developed which will alert users about a quake by producing a unique beeping sound.

n areas where there is no mobile connectivity, the early warning system will be connected with All India Radio.
An early warning system software has also been prepared, Kumar said.

Via

— TimesofIndia

 

Why engineers loved working for Steve Jobs


Steve Jobs wasn’t the easiest CEO to work for, but those who did work with him were willing to put up with his high standards and intense demands.

Even though Jobs would call his engineers on holidays and weekends, they felt the experience of working with him was worth it.

Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli’s book, “Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader,” portrays this side of Jobs.

Here’s how they described Jobs’ relationship with his engineers while working at NeXT:

Steve’s arbitrary decisions dumbfounded those under him at NeXT, and his micromanagement gave them no peace. He assumed they would work nights and weekends. He wouldn’t hesitate to call them at home on Sundays or holidays if he’d discovered some “urgent” problem. And yet hardware and software engineers still could not resist working for Steve Jobs.

Steve understood the sensibility of engineers. Engineers, at heart, are problem solvers. They thrive on digging their way out of sinkholes, especially the gnarly kind with no clear path forward. Steve challenged them in ways they had never imagined. No one else in the computer business had such radical goals and expectations; no one else seemed to care so much about their work. The idea of creating a computer that could transform the very process of education was cool; but to his incredibly talented programmers and gearheads, the idea of creating this particular computer for this particular boss was irresistible.

But it wasn’t just engineers that loved working for Jobs at NeXT – Ken Rosen, a managing partner at consulting agency Performance Works, worked in the emerging markets manager of Jobs’ company in the late 1980s’ and early 1990s’. He said Jobs was tough, but it was worth the experience. Rosen said he learned one of the most valuable management lessons of his career while working with Jobs.

He just really wanted to develop an organization where people knew what good products were,” Rosen said in a previous interview with Business Insider.

R.I.P. Google+?


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Google’s Google+ social network, touted by some as a potential “Facebook killer” upon its 2011 release, could end up split into multiple parts.

“Just wanted to confirm that the rumors are true—I’m excited to be running Google’s Photos and Streams products!” Google Vice President Bradley Horowitz wrote on his Google+ page. “It’s important to me that these changes are properly understood to be positive improvements to both our products and how they reach users.”

While there’s no official word from Google on whether Google+ is headed for the digital chopping block, Horowitz’s posting suggests the service could undergo a significant rebranding in coming months. If so, “Photos” is a logical candidate for a standalone service. Over the past few years, Google+ has developed a reputation as a place where digital shutterbugs congregate to share images, so it seems logical that Google would double down on that aspect of things.

The second allusion in Horowitz’s posting, “Streams,” is much more ambiguous. It presumably refers to the activity/news streams that dominate the profiles of Google+ users, but it remains unclear how exactly Google will shift things around to emphasize this functionality.

At this month’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Google Senior Vice President Sundar Pichai also told the audience that Hangouts, the popular communications platform that currently exists as part of Google+, might end up as a standalone product of some sort. “And we’re going to put more energy into it,” he said, according to The Verge. “We’re seeing good traction there and so we’ll work hard to get to the next stage.”

At least one thing is clear: Google+ will likely end up looking very different in the months and years ahead—if it even continues to exist under that name.

Source: Techgig