5 things you will understand if your passion becomes your job


imagesIt is a usual Monday morning. The clock strikes seven. Your alarm clock acts like the hostel’s old matron who just cannot see you sleep peacefully. Like most of the working population, you want to strangle that tiny little thing to death. You wake up and stare at the wall. You contemplate if you really need the job. This is a common morning scenario when you do not like your job. But, what happens when you have a job that you are passionate about? Let us see:

1) You do not need the snooze button

Waking up early is a task. For young adults who love to party after work, it gets even harder. But if you have a job that you are passionate about, you happily turn into an early bird. You cannot wait to get started on the day. Just like schooldays, when you would not sleep the night before for fear of missing the picnic! When the alarm goes off, you get going.

2) Goodbye Monday morning blues

For people who are passionate about their work, the Monday morning blues is an alien concept. You long to get back to work on a Monday morning. You tend to be as excited to go to work as one would be while going on the last day of the week. That is the magic of embracing your passion.

3) Overtime? Bring it on!

You fail to understand why your friends whine about putting in extra hours at work. You are almost unaffected by the clock hands. You do not mind working over the weekends either. In fact, you can happily plan your weekend around your work.

4) You have a clear career goal

Building a career is never easy. Yet, there are people who do it, for money or for an intangible, better future. But you do not have to worry much. You know what you want to do in life; you have a clear goal. There is no two ways about it. You invest all your time and effort in achieving this goal.

5) Honing skills

If you are passionate about your job, you find all the ways possible to grow and become better. So, there’s a good chance you are constantly on the lookout for new skills and knowledge. No one has to tell you to take new courses or learn new concepts. You are quite self-motivated in this case.

You spend around nine hours at work every day. To be productive, it is important that you enjoy what you do in those hours. This becomes possible when your passion becomes your job.

Source

Increasing demand of part time jobs – eJobsJunction


EJobsJunction provides work from Home.

World All Around

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Hearing about the part time jobs, a question arises “Why we need it?” It is only because to earn extra money out of the spare time that we as a student spend doing nothing. The best parts about these days jobs are one can use their free time in making money online working from home rather than searching for jobs to work in pizzas shops for delivering food items, bookstores and gift shops. It is better to use your research and academic skills as well as the valuable experience to earn money.
Nowadays these jobs see an increased demand among the students. Some of them need these jobs to financially support their family and some need to add extra cash to their pocket money just for enjoyment purposes. The trendy generation uses this money to buy books, gifts for their special ones, watching movies and shopping e.t.c. With the use…

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How to find jobs that go unadvertised


unadvertised-jobThe job market is under a constant squeeze and it is tougher than ever before to secure a good job in this market. Over the last few years there have been enormous advancements in different industrial fields, thus creating millions of jobs all over the world. However, the economic recession has taken its toll on the overall job market and job seekers nowadays are finding it increasingly difficult to land up with a good job. It is to be kept in mind that a major portion of the total vacancies available in the market goes unadvertised and job seekers have to tap into this unadvertised jobs in order to open a whole new world of employment opportunities.

Attending trade fairs and conferences can provide an excellent opportunity to get an idea about the employment opportunities in different organizations. It is mainly important because these exhibitions and conferences allow job seekers to come in direct contact with industry leaders and recruiters. They also provide an excellent opportunity for networking, thus making it possible for job seekers to secure a good job.

Another important and effective way of tapping in to unadvertised jobs is through social media. In recent years social media has emerged to be one of the strongest platforms that bring a large number of people together. Hence, social media websites can be a reliable source where job seekers can get from their friends detailed information about different jobs available in the market.

One can also contact employers directly if one has to know about the current market opportunities. It is to be kept in mind that business organizations that do not advertise for jobs always tend to employ people who come with a reference or a recommendation. Hence, it is a must to have a good letter of recommendation when contacting directly with employers.

It’s ‘internship time’ at Facebook, Google, Apple


MOUNTAIN VIEW: Sitting in a kitchen stocked with free food, a handful of 20-something Google summer interns weigh their favorite perks, but where to begin? With bikes, buses, massages, swimming pools, dance classes, nap pods, parties and access to their tech heroes, it’s a very long list.

“Unlimited sparkling water?” someone says.

In the end, however, the budding Googlers are most excited about the work.

“The project I’m working on is super high impact, and I’m looking for ways to make my mark,” says Rita DeRaedt, 20, studying visual communication technology at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. She admitted to being a bit star-struck after she was assigned to a team headed by a designer she’s long admired.

With summer’s arrival comes an influx of thousands of Silicon Valley interns. Well paid and perked, young up-and-comers from around the world who successfully navigate the competitive application process are assigned big time responsibility at firms such as Google, Facebook, Dropbox and Twitter.

Silicon Valley tech firms pay their interns more than any other sector in the US, according to a Top 25 list of 2014 intern pay by online career website Glassdoor.

Palantir Technologies, a Palo Alto-based cybersecurity firm, topped the list with $7,012 average monthly base pay. Also on the list: Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, eBay, Google and Apple, all of which pay more than $5,000 a month, or $60,000 annually if these were full time jobs.

And that’s not counting the perks, which at Facebook even include housing in this high rent region.

Executives hope that a fun and stimulating summer will motivate them to come back after graduation to launch careers. It’s money well spent in a field fighting for talent, says Keck Graduate Institute professor Joel West in Claremont, who hired interns when he ran his own software company, and now helps place students at internships.

(Image courtesy: Google)

(Image courtesy: Google)

“When you’re an employer, interns are a win-win, because you get relatively cheap labor and you get a first look at talented and ambitious people,” he says. “You get first dibs on them.”

Indeed, many of the internships turn into careers.

Max Schireson, CEO of database startup MongoDB, with offices in Palo Alto and New York, says they nurture former interns, 35 this summer selected from a pool of 3,000, when they return to their respective schools – primarily Brown, MIT, Stanford and Princeton.

“We try to keep in touch with them both to keep that relationship warm but also because they can help us in identifying our next crop,” Schireson says.

Schireson says that while there’s solid pay, with food, drink and candy around the office, there are limits. Ultimately, he says, “we want people attracted mostly by the workplace challenges.”

Typically, interns are assigned to collaborative teams working on specific projects; computer science student might be writing software code to make failed passcode attempts erase data, while a human resources student might be creating online learning modules for new hires.

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(Inside Facebook headquarters)

Serial entrepreneur Jon Bischke, currently CEO of San Francisco-based Entelo, a tech recruiter, said interns better arrive ready to hustle.

“Companies in Silicon Valley are growing faster than literally any companies anywhere since the beginning of time,” he said. “The energy is palpable and for people who appreciate fast-paced environments, you won’t find anything faster than what’s going on in Silicon Valley right now.”

But there is an effort to keep hours reasonable, and many said East Coast financial sector interns work longer hours for less pay.

“We believe in paying for work and paying our interns, full stop, but we don’t believe in making interns work all hours of the day unnecessarily, and think there are lessons to be learned in terms of managing time and workflow,” said Google spokeswoman Meghan Casserly. Overtime is allowed, however, for projects that warrant it, she says.

Chris Crawford was 18, a student at University of California, Santa Cruz, when he landed his first internship at nearby Cupertino-based Apple. He spent the next five summers interning at Apple, two in public relations, three at iTunes.

“I love Apple technology, I’m a musician and I loved what they were doing in the music industry, and I got real life business experience there,” says Crawford, who went on to launch his own startup, Loudr.fm, in 2009, an online service where musicians can sell cover songs and original music to fans, or through iTunes, Spotify, Google Play and other sites.

Now and then, he says, their little firm of eight even gets an intern.

Google’s head of global staffing Kyle Ewing says the biggest misconception about their interns is that they are all computer scientists from elite universities. Instead, Google, and many other firms, have outreach programs to both diversify their workforce and provide opportunities for non-technical students.

How to get a job at Google


News 24 in 7MOUNTAIN VIEW: How’s my kid going to get a job? There are few questions I hear more often than that one.

In February, I interviewed Laszlo Bock, who is in charge of all hiring at Google – about 100 new hires a week – to try to understand what an employer like Google was looking for and why it was increasingly ready to hire people with no college degrees. Bock’s remarks generated a lot of reader response, particularly his point that prospective bosses today care less about what you know or where you learned it – the Google machine knows everything now – than what value you can create with what you know. With graduations approaching, I went back to Google to ask Bock to share his best advice for job-seekers anywhere, not just at Google. Here is a condensed version of our conversations:

 

You’re not saying college education is worthless?

“My belief is not that one shouldn’t go to college,” Bock said.

It is that among 18- to 22-year-olds – or people returning to school years later – “most don’t put enough thought into why they’re going, and what they want to get out of it.” Of course, we want an informed citizenry, where everyone has a baseline of knowledge from which to build skills. That is a social good. But, he added, don’t just go to college because you think it is the right thing to do and that any bachelor’s degree will suffice.

“The first and most important thing is to be explicit and willful in making the decisions about what you want to get out of this investment in your education.” It’s a huge investment of time, effort and money and people should think “incredibly hard about what they’re getting in return.”

Once there, said Bock, make sure that you’re getting out of it not only a broadening of your knowledge but skills that will be valued in today’s workplace. Your college degree is not a proxy anymore for having the skills or traits to do any job.

 

What are those traits?

One is grit, he said. Shuffling through resumes of some of Google’s 100 hires that week, Bock explained: “I was on campus speaking to a student who was a computer science and math double major, who was thinking of shifting to an economics major because the computer science courses were too difficult. I told that student they are much better off being a B student in computer science than an A+ student in English because it signals a rigor in your thinking and a more challenging course load. That student will be one of our interns this summer.”

Or, he added, think of this headline from The Wall Street Journal in 2011: “Students Pick Easier Majors Despite Less Pay.” This was an article about a student who switched from electrical and computer engineering to a major in psychology. She said she just found the former too difficult and would focus instead on a career in public relations and human resources. “I think this student was making a mistake,” said Bock, even if it meant lower grades. “She was moving out of a major where she would have been differentiated in the labor force” and “out of classes that would have made her better qualified for other jobs because of the training.”

This is key for Bock because the first thing Google looks for “is general cognitive ability – the ability to learn things and solve problems,” he said. In that vein, “a knowledge set that will be invaluable is the ability to understand and apply information – so, basic computer science skills. I’m not saying you have to be some terrific coder, but to just understand how [these] things work you have to be able to think in a formal and logical and structured way.” But that kind of thinking doesn’t have to come from a computer science degree. “I took statistics at business school, and it was transformative for my career. Analytical training gives you a skill set that differentiates you from most people in the labor market.”

A lot of work, he added, is no longer tied to location.

“So if you want your job tied to where you are, you need to be: A) quite good at it; and B) you need to be very adaptable so that you have a baseline skill set that allows you to be a call center operator today and tomorrow be able to interpret MRI scans. To have built the skill set that allows you to do both things requires a baseline capability that’s analytical.”

 

Well, what about creativity?

Bock: “Humans are by nature creative beings, but not by nature logical, structured-thinking beings. Those are skills you have to learn. One of the things that makes people more effective is if you can do both. … If you’re great on both attributes, you’ll have a lot more options. If you have just one, that’s fine, too.” But a lot fewer people have this kind of structured thought process and creativity.

 

Are the liberal arts still important?

They are “phenomenally important,” he said, especially when you combine them with other disciplines. “Ten years ago behavioral economics was rarely referenced. But [then] you apply social science to economics and suddenly there’s this whole new field. I think a lot about how the most interesting things are happening at the intersection of two fields. To pursue that, you need expertise in both fields. You have to understand economics and psychology or statistics and physics [and] bring them together. You need some people who are holistic thinkers and have liberal arts backgrounds and some who are deep functional experts. Building that balance is hard, but that’s where you end up building great societies, great organizations.”

 

How do you write a good resume?

“The key,” he said, “is to frame your strengths as: ‘I accomplished X, relative to Y, by doing Z.’ Most people would write a resume like this: ‘Wrote editorials for The New York Times.’ Better would be to say: ‘Had 50 op-eds published compared to average of six by most op-ed [writers] as a result of providing deep insight into the following area for three years.’ Most people don’t put the right content on their resumes.”

 

What’s your best advice for job interviews?

“What you want to do is say: ‘Here’s the attribute I’m going to demonstrate; here’s the story demonstrating it; here’s how that story demonstrated that attribute.’ ” And here is how it can create value. “Most people in an interview don’t make explicit their thought process behind how or why they did something and, even if they are able to come up with a compelling story, they are unable to explain their thought process.”

For parents, new grads and those too long out of work, I hope some of this helps.

India Inc is hiring again


2cabeaf0-c457-11e3-8ba6-e7fc5e9e33b6_10-Job_TSIndia Inc is hiring again. Which means that if you are educated and jobless, your good times start now.

The spurt in hiring, suggests the latest TimesJobs.com RecruiteX survey, is sparked by the April-May general elections, with the expectation that the next government will stabilize the economy and spark growth.

The survey says the Project/Infrastructure sector, with a 12 percent rise in demand, is the top employment generator. The Railway/Metro segment, where technical expertise in design and execution is highly valued, is growing exponentially as is Petrochemicals, which recorded a 9 percent increase in job creation. Other areas where job opportunities are expected to spike, as per the survey:

• IT/Telecom sector by 6 percent
• Healthcare/Biotechnology/Pharmaceutical by 5 percent
• Manufacturing and Engineering by 5 percent
• Construction/Cement/Metal/Steel/Iron industry by 9 percent

In all above sectors, the greatest demand will be for trained engineers – a job profile that is expected to grow by 12 percent.

Work Experience is Key

Educational qualifications aside, a high premium attaches to prior work experience. RecruiteX data shows that in March 2014, demand for professionals with over 20 years of experience increased by more than 30 percent. Those with 10-20 years and over 20 years of experience together accounted for 65 percent of the total demand. Demand for candidates with 5-10 years experience spiked 2 percent, while demand for candidates with 2-5 years of experience stayed stable, with no spike.

Opportunities for candidates with less than two years experience however dropped 6 percent month on month.

AP tops in opportunity

Hyderabad, with a 30 per cent job rise in March 2014, emerged as the city with the greatest opportunities followed by Chennai with a 20 percent spike. Delhi/NCR (6 percent) and Pune (3 percent) also witnessed strong growth.

Among the states, Andhra Pradesh (excluding Hyderabad) tops with 20 percent increase in demand for talent.

While these trends are true for now, it is likely that the outcome of the elections and the contours of the next government will have an even greater impact on employment trends in the near future.

Executives likely to see 15-20 per cent salary hikes in FY15


News 24 in 7With economic prospects looking better, executives are expected to see their pay packets increase as much as 20 per cent in the next financial year, feel experts.

Although the salary hikes could see significant variations across sectors, pharmaceutical and automobile industries are likely to see the maximum increases, HR experts said.

“The expected hike is estimated to be 15-20 per cent. It should be better as economy is looking upwards,” HR firm Unison International’s Managing Director Udit Mittal said.

According to him, some multinational companies might also extend additional perks to their senior level executives.Latest projections by executive search firm MANCER Consulting showed that middle- and senior-level professionals in the country are likely to get a pay hike in the range of 10 to 20 per cent. Similar increases could also been with respect to bonuses.

MANCER Consulting CEO Satya D Sinha said executives especially in the pharmaceutical, automobile and realty sectors, are expected to see better appraisals next financial year.

While pharmaceutical industry is anticipated to get salary hike of 14-15 per cent, that in automobile segment is likely to 13-14 per cent. Real estate sector is projected to register 12-14 per cent increase in pay packets.

Executive search firm Spectrum Talent Management’s Director Vidur Gupta said sectors such as pharmaceutical, chemicals and consumer goods sectors – that are largely dependent on domestic economy – could see significant hikes.

“With a general election to be concluded by the end of May 2014, many are looking to the country’s next government to break India out of its economic doldrums. A stable government will definitely have a positive impact on the overall economic condition and hence there will be something good for employees as well,” he said.

Striking an optimistic note for the coming months, Sinha said services, mining, construction and infrastructure are expected to up their hiring activities as well as increase salaries.

“A hike of 2-4 per cent is expected in hiring in 2014. This is owing to positive growth in GDP and high expectations from Lok Saba Elections in 2014,” he noted.

Experts also opined that companies need to be careful while carrying out appraisals since there is need to retain performers and provide them with decent pay hikes.